1902 Nile Agreement

Ethiopia claims that there is no legal basis to prevent Addis Ababa from using the waters of the Nile fairly. The obligation imposed by the Anglo-Ethiopian Treaty of 1902 did not prohibit Ethiopia from using the waters of the Nile, even without the agreement of Great Britain (now Sudan). But what is forbidden is the total blockage of the entire river from the waters of the Nile. Many arguments have been put forward as to why Ethiopia is not bound by the 1902 treaty between Ethiopia and the British Empire. One such reason is that the English and Amharic versions of the treaty were not ratified because the English and Amharian versions did not fit in context. While the English version was eventually signed by the British Empire, the Amharic version of Emperor Menilik was retained. In fact, the emperor was so worried about the context that he sent his Swiss advisor Alfred Ilg to add details in the English version. Ilg was never able to insert these details. Subsequently, Ras Tafari worked to obtain clarification on this treaty, but when the Italians invaded Ethiopia, efforts were frozen. In the 1950s, the Ethiopian government officially rejected the treaty, with Britain repeatedly violating the terms of the agreement by supporting the 1936 Italian invasion. In the hydropolitical context, Ethiopia had been able to make its own canoe in the first half of the 20th century, but a mixture of factors coincided to deprive it of any useful perspective in the use of the Nile`s water resources in its jurisdiction. I assert that the 1902 Anglo-Ethiopian Treaty on blue Nile and the negotiations that immediately followed the granting of concessions for Lake Tana had adverse effects on Ethiopia`s legal situation and sovereign interests. Ethiopia`s imperial fluctuations were harassing and the British hegemonic plans of the time leaned too much towards Sudan and Egypt.

As a result, the period following 1950 saw a decrease in the influence of Ethiopia`s hydro-legal attitude and the formation of deep perceptions of property along the Nile downstream. Only one of the articles, Article III of that 1902 treaty, dealt with the use of Nile water. . . .